Friday, February 26, 2010

market news

Some markets open, while others close:

- Aberrant Dreams: They have been open to fiction subs and they have just reopened to poetry subs as well, and changed the look of their website. Pays 3 cents/word for fiction and $1/line for poetry. I can't vouch for them because they've been holding on to one of my poems since 2008, but they used to be a good market to submit to.
- Acorn: The winter submission period closes February 28th, so get those haiku in now.
- ChiZine: Will reopen to poetry subs on March 1st. Pays $10/poem.
- flashquake: The reading period for their summer issue begins March 1st. Pays $5-25 for flash fiction, flash nonfiction, poetry, and artwork.

Someone at Amazon must have gotten wind of how low Baseball Haiku was selling for, because now it's back up to $13.57. I hope everyone who wanted a copy got one.

Speaking of Amazon, David Dunwoody's zombie novel Empire is being re-released with a brand new cover. Anyone interested can preorder a copy for $10.20.

Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Two fiction markets with quick response times

Page Forty-Seven is not a genre publication, but it is a good market for new writers. The editors want short stories up to 10,000 characters long, for which they'll pay $25-75. Simultaneous submissions are accepted, and if they like your story, they'll get back to you within a week.

Dog Oil Press is looking for dark humor under 981 words. Submit unpublished works only -- fiction, poetry, or nonfiction. Selected works will be paid $10. According to Duotrope, they have an average response time of 11 days.

For FanStory.com members, here are three FanStory contests with upcoming deadlines:

- Cinquain contest (closes 2/18)
- Haiku contest (closes 3/5)
- Horror story contest (closes 3/22)

All three contests have a top prize of a $100 Visa gift card, with second and third place winners receiving 25 and 10 "member dollars," respectively.

Saturday, February 13, 2010

5 novels I wish I'd written

Charles Gramlich made a post a while back in which he listed five novels he wished he'd written. Here are my five:

1. Treasure Island, by Robert Louis Stevenson
2. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, by Douglas Adams
3. 1984, by George Orwell
4. War of the Worlds, by H.G. Wells
5. The Dharma Bums, by Jack Kerouac

If anyone still hasn't picked up a copy of Baseball Haiku, it's down to only $3.67 on Amazon. Not bad for a brand new hardcover book. (If you spend $25, you get free shipping.)

Monday, February 8, 2010

Haiku Now!

The Haiku Foundation is hosting its first national haiku contest, called the Haiku Now! Contest. The contest is for haiku in three different categories: traditional, contemporary, and innovative. There is no fee for entry, but each poet can only enter 1 poem in each category, and all poems must be unpublished. First prize in each category will be awarded $100, and honorable mentions will get $25. Billy Collins will be judging the traditional category, and Jim Kacian is judging the other two. Deadline is March 31st.

If you want to get inspired to write some haiku for the contest, start by reading some good poems. The 2009 Red Moon Anthology, where the wind turns, can be ordered from the Red Moon Press website. I haven't ordered my copy yet, but Deborah P. Kolodji wrote a brief write-up of the anthology and it sounds good.

Thursday, February 4, 2010

a horror contest & the new Apex

Dark Moon Books is holding a fiction contest to fill its newest anthology, MONSTERS! The editors want monster stories 2000-6000 words long that have not been published in print. (Online publication is OK as long as you still hold the copyright.) The entry fee is $5 per story, and the three top prizes are $100, $50, and $25. Selected stories will be chosen for publication in the anthology, and any writer whose story is included will get a contributor's copy. The submission deadline is April 10th.

The February issue of Apex Magazine is now live... read all the stories and vote for your favorite. And if that's not enough speculative fiction for you, check out Charles Gramlich's science fiction/horror story "Hunter's Moon" from October's Beat to a Pulp.